Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8984 records – page 1 of 450.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):470-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1994
Author
L G Johnsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):470-1
Date
Feb-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
8009490 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Jan;100(1):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Gloria Fraser
Author Affiliation
Environment Health Clinic, Sunnybrook, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can Nurse. 2004 Jan;100(1):16-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Environmental health
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Priorities
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nurses - psychology
Organizational Innovation
Risk assessment
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2004 Apr;100(4):7-8; author reply 815124425
PubMed ID
14969011 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska Environmental Health Association (AEHA)

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288383
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Environmental Health Association
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Public Health
Environmental health
Health Personnel
Environment
Abstract
AEHA is a professional group of sanitarians and environmental health professionals who work to control those factors of the environment that result or may result in harmful effects to the health and well-being of all Alaskans.
Online Resources
Less detail

Environmental health experiences in disaster

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4396
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1970 Mar;60(3):475-480
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1970
  1 website  
Author
Alter, AJ
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Welfare
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1970 Mar;60(3):475-480
Date
Mar-1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Communication
Disasters
Emergency medical services
Environmental health
Food Supply
Public Health Administration
Sanitary Engineering
Water supply
Abstract
Earthquake and flood disasters in Alaska created problems for effective environmental control. The problem of maintaining such control is analyzed in terms of plans and activities. Weaknesses in terms of communication are discussed.
Notes
PMID: 5461525
PubMed ID
5461525 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail
Source
Regist Nurse. 1990 Feb;2(1):26-31, 38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
L. Harris
Source
Regist Nurse. 1990 Feb;2(1):26-31, 38
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Environmental health
Environmental monitoring
Health Policy
Humans
Ontario
Public health nursing
PubMed ID
2315531 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk assessment for environmental health.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246683
Source
Can J Public Health. 1979 Nov-Dec;70(6):388-92
Publication Type
Article

Research priorities in environmental health.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49229
Source
BMJ. 1999 Jun 19;318(7199):1636-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1999
Author
G. Pershagen
Source
BMJ. 1999 Jun 19;318(7199):1636-7
Date
Jun-19-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Europe
Health Priorities
Humans
Research
Abstract
Environmental issues tend to greater political attention than do environmental health aspects. Therefore, when conflicts of interest occur with other environmental concerns, negative consequences for public health may result. For example, a strategy to substantially reduce indoor ventilation in many dwellings in Scandinavia in order to save energy has led to increased humidity levels and higher prevalences of house dust mites. Wood burning for local heating is promoted because it is a renewable source of energy, and diesel vehicles are promoted because they emit lower levels of carbon dioxide per kilometer compared to conventional gas engines, but both practices lead to increased emissions of fine particulates, which have been associated with adverse health effects. Increasing the level of resources available for research into environmental health is one way to help environmental health issues receive greater attention. Environmental health research initiatives taken by the European Commission, the European Science Foundation, and the World Health Organization's regional office for Europe are noted. Environmental health research is multidisciplinary and should encompass basic science as well as applied research. International collaboration is often very useful in environmental health research.
PubMed ID
10373150 View in PubMed
Less detail

Urban environmental health hazards and health equity.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95639
Source
J Urban Health. 2007 May;84(3 Suppl):i86-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Kjellstrom Tord
Friel Sharon
Dixon Jane
Corvalan Carlos
Rehfuess Eva
Campbell-Lendrum Diarmid
Gore Fiona
Bartram Jamie
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Ostersund, Sweden.
Source
J Urban Health. 2007 May;84(3 Suppl):i86-97
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developing Countries
Hazardous Substances
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Policy Making
Population Density
Poverty
Social Environment
Urban health
World Health Organization
Abstract
This paper outlines briefly how the living environment can affect health. It explains the links between social and environmental determinants of health in urban settings. Interventions to improve health equity through the environment include actions and policies that deal with proximal risk factors in deprived urban areas, such as safe drinking water supply, reduced air pollution from household cooking and heating as well as from vehicles and industry, reduced traffic injury hazards and noise, improved working environment, and reduced heat stress because of global climate change. The urban environment involves health hazards with an inequitable distribution of exposures and vulnerabilities, but it also involves opportunities for implementing interventions for health equity. The high population density in many poor urban areas means that interventions at a small scale level can assist many people, and existing infrastructure can sometimes be upgraded to meet health demands. Interventions at higher policy levels that will create more sustainable and equitable living conditions and environments include improved city planning and policies that take health aspects into account in every sector. Health equity also implies policies and actions that improve the global living environment, for instance, limiting greenhouse gas emissions. In a global equity perspective, improving the living environment and health of the poor in developing country cities requires actions to be taken in the most affluent urban areas of the world. This includes making financial and technical resources available from high-income countries to be applied in low-income countries for urgent interventions for health equity. This is an abbreviated version of a paper on "Improving the living environment" prepared for the World Health Organization Commission on Social Determinants of Health, Knowledge Network on Urban Settings.
PubMed ID
17450427 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental health risk management in Canada.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242151
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1983 Mar;3(1):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983
Author
E. Somers
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1983 Mar;3(1):75-81
Date
Mar-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Risk
Abstract
The legislative basis of the federal Canadian government's control of toxic chemicals is described and examples are given of the practical application, ranging from recommendations to a ban on the sale of the product. The ordered sequence of risk assessment and the application of risk estimation techniques are considered. It is clear that the ultimate political decision is not amenable to simplistic scientific analysis, although risk analysis is valuable in defining, rather than solving, the problem.
PubMed ID
6612005 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental health - from exposure to biomarkers

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286393
Source
Page 342 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
, University of Kuopio, Finland Biological, biochemical and molecular markers are needed in order to find a pattern of measurable parameters for environmental health. Our project concentrates on a selection of potentially useful molecular biomarkers, by using human placental perfusion, cell culture models
  1 document  
Author
A. Rautio
P. Myllynen
K. Vahakangas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu
Department of Biosciences (Pharmacology and Toxicology), University of Oulu
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland
Source
Page 342 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Posters. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
Less detail

Meta-analysis of environmental health data.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4355
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:545-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1995
Author
V. Hasselblad
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Policy Research and Education, Duke University, Durham, NC.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:545-58
Date
Jan-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Arctic Regions
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental health
Humans
Meta-Analysis
Models, Statistical
Abstract
Most airborne contaminants have minimal health effects at typical ambient levels, and this is especially true for contaminant levels in the Arctic. Among multiple studies of similar health effects, usually only one or two of the studies show statistically significant effects. Only after an attempt to quantitatively combine the data might some consistency emerge or might the sources of inconsistency be explored. Methods for combining the data from such studies are presented. The methods include combining P-values, combining effect measures using fixed effects models, and combining effect measures using random effects models. Examples of the methods applied to several pollutants, including lead and oxides of nitrogen, are given. Some discussion of the implications of these findings to contaminant levels found in the Arctic is presented.
PubMed ID
7892584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental health considerations in the Arctic.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4375
Source
Pages 145-148 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 145-148, 1988 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CONSIDERATIONS IN THE ARCTIC J.I. Waddington WHO Regional Office for Europe, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract. The author stresses that the arctic environment is not only threatened by the adverse effects of
  1 document  
Author
Waddington, J.J
Author Affiliation
WHO Regional Office for Europe, Coppenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 145-148 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Environmental health - trends
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Humans
PubMed ID
3272596 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Knowledge translation in Arctic environmental health.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120744
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eric Dewailly
Chris Furgal
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Environmental health
Humans
Translational Medical Research
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2010 Feb;7(2):651-7420616996
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2006 Dec;28(4):384-917082462
PubMed ID
22973571 View in PubMed
Less detail

Introduction: women's occupational and environmental health.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169233
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Jun;101(2):147-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Karen Messing
Donna Mergler
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Jun;101(2):147-8
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Occupational Health
Women's health
PubMed ID
16709470 View in PubMed
Less detail

Environmental health collaboration: United States and Russia.

https://www.arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183668
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
C H Rubin
R L Jones
B. Revich
S L Avaliani
E. Gurvich
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Health Studies Branch, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. CRubin@cdc.gov
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - poisoning
Humans
Infant
International Cooperation
Lead Poisoning - blood
Medical Laboratory Science - instrumentation - methods
Pesticides - poisoning
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia
United States
Abstract
Developed nations share similar challenges to human health from commercial and agricultural chemicals that are released into the environment. Although Russia and the United States are historically distinct and unique, both countries are geographically large and economically dependent on emission-producing surface transportation. This paper describes U.S.-Russian collaborative activities that grew from a 1995 conference in Moscow that brought together environmental health investigators from both countries to discuss common concerns about the human health impact of environmental pollutants. Lead, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and mercury were identified as contaminants of greatest concern. Collaborative studies were initiated that included collecting blood and hair samples and splitting samples for analyses in both countries, and introducing and sharing new portable blood and environmental sample analyses instruments. The findings demonstrated that hair analysis was not a good predictor of BLL and that Russian children in the first city sampled had a mean BLL of 7.7 microg/dl. Although higher than the U.S. mean, this level was below the 10.0 microg/dl CDC level of concern. This manuscript summarizes additional study results and describes their impacts on Russian policy. On-going collaborative environmental investigations are described.
PubMed ID
12971688 View in PubMed
Less detail

8984 records – page 1 of 450.